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Solar Battery Rebates for California PG&E Customers

There has been a lot of talk about adding energy storage systems when installing solar or adding them onto existing solar systems. Now there is a way to get much of the cost to install batteries covered if you are a customer of Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) in California (note: you will need a SGIP listed installer or electrician to get the rebate).


The SGIP rebate for energy storage systems has been increased for certain customers and in some cases, it may be high enough to cover the majority of the cost of installing batteries with your solar.

The best PG&E SGIP rebate available is the “Equity Resiliency” incentive which is $1.00 per watt hour of battery capacity which will be close to the cost of battery equipment and installation. To be eligible for this, you must reside in a place affected by the Public Safety Power Shutoffs (PSPS). This means you either live in a Tier 2 or Tier 3 High Fire Threat District based on the map here (https://ia.cpuc.ca.gov/firemap/) or living in a home that has had the electricity shut off twice for PSPS.

You also have to meet one of these criteria; be eligible for or enrolled in a Medical Baseline rate, have a potentially life-threatening illness or condition if the power shuts off, rely on an electric well pump for your water supply, have solar incentives reserved in the SASH or DAC-SASH programs for disadvantaged or low income households, you are a Low Income Homeowner as defined in Section 2852(a)(3)(c), or you are a Low Income Renter living in a multifamily residential building with more than 5 deed restricted units that is either in a Disadvantaged Community or where 80% of the households have incomes that are at least 60% lower than the area median income.

The next level of PG&E SGIP incentive is the “Equity” incentive which is $0.85 per watt hour of battery capacity. This is for people who live outside of the high fire threat areas. To qualify for this one, you must meet one of the need based criteria; have solar incentives reserved in the SASH or DAC-SASH programs for disadvantaged or low income households, you are a Low Income Homeowner as defined in Section 2852(a)(3)(c), or you are a Low Income Renter living in a multifamily residential building with more than 5 deed restricted units that is either in a Disadvantaged Community or here 80% of the households have incomes that are at least 60% lower than the area median income.

There are also SGIP incentives for non-residential PG&E customers. There is an Equity Resiliency program that pays $1.00 per watt hour for police stations, fire stations, emergency operations center, 911 call centers, medical facilities, natural gas facilities, water or wastewater facilities, PSPS assistance centers, jails, prisons, cooling centers, homeless shelters, grocery stores or corner stores with less that $15 million in annual receipts, independent living centers and food banks that are in a Tier 2 or Tier 3 High Fire Threat District or have their electricity shut off twice for PSPS. If you aren’t in the fire areas, there is also the Equity incentive of $0.85 per watt hour of battery capacity for government agencies, educational institutions, non-profit organizations or small businesses that are located in a Disadvantaged Community, California Indian Country or in a census tract with a median household income below 80% of the Statewide Median Income.

For more information on how to take advantage of these amazing incentives, check out this website:
https://www.pge.com/en_US/small-medium-business/energy-alternatives/private-solar/understand-the-solar-process.page?WT.mc_id=Vanity_sgip or call the experts at GoGreenSolar.com who can also help you determine what solar and battery equipment is right for you.

Author: Harold Tan

I believe clean, renewable energy is key to the evolution of society as a whole. Solar powers our planet, why not harness it to power humanity? Let's power our homes, our work, and our vehicles with solar energy. It begins with raising awareness and encouraging those around us to go green.

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