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USA Today Features GoGreenSolar Customer’s Dream Home!

GoGreenSolar.com customers Philippe and Thao Jeanty have received national attention after purchasing a 9.4 kW solar system with GoGreenSolar.com.  The couple from Tennessee was recently featured on USAToday.com. and mentioned in the New York Times.  Here’s their story. Philippe Jeanty is a radiologist in Nashville, Tenneessee, though he was actually born in Congo and lived in Belgium for some time.  Philippe lives with his wife Thao, who grew up in Vietnam. Philippe made a trip to the United States in the late seventies, where became interested in energy efficiency.   This curiosity eventually became the driving force behind the development of the couple’s sustainable dream home that most clean energy enthusiasts will only passively dream of.   Their home now has geothermal heating and cooling, it’s own drip irrigation system to water their garden, solar hot water heating, and a photovolatic (PV) system. Philippe he received help from a local solar guru with the photovoltaic (PV) installation, but he designed the plans for his home with an application called Google SketchUp.  Philippe bypassed the typical method of hiring an architect, allowing him to channel his DIY work ethic.  The SkechUp plans were converted to blueprints by Scott Jenkins, and the house was built by Green Homes (Johnny and Travis Johnson). Local springs supply the couple with usable water for their quaint farm. Their home is even set up with a drip-irrigation system to water their orchard and garden!  To heat their water, they make use of an evacuated tube solar heating system by Apricus.  According to Philippe, the water heater produces an excess of hot water in the summer.  “We have to flush out some hot water from time to time,” comments Philippe.   The interior of the home is equipped with LED lighting and clerestory windows that provide great light in the summer with no insolation.  They oriented the house on an East-West axis to get the best insolation possible.  South-facing windows are shaded during the summer months by the roof overhang, and are fully insolated during the winter to help passively warm the house.  In addition to designing the home for passive solar, the six and a half inch walls are insultated with a corn-based spray foam. They have also installed a geothermal heating and cooling system under their hickory wood floors, which they haven’t had to use the past three winters, even with outside temperatures of five degrees Fahrenheit! Philippe and Thao held onto wood, windows, bathroom fixtures, and just about anything from their previous home that could be repurposed.  By collecting fallen trees on the property for their wood-burning stove, Philippe and Thao keep their home toasty during the winter months.   Wood that was once part of their old house...

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To Buy or Not to Buy? Solar System Purchase Vs Power Purchase Agreement
Jun20

To Buy or Not to Buy? Solar System Purchase Vs Power Purchase Agreement

Solar System Purchase vs. Power Purchase Agreement  Long before there were any federal or state funds to help offset the initial investment of a residential solar system, installations were on the rise.  Solar adoption has increased significantly since the inception of the federal solar tax incentive in 2006, which rebates 30% of the purchase price of the system.  In 2007, the California Solar Initiative was implemented to offset all or part of the cost of installation in proportion to the system’s actual or projected performance.  With all of this support from the government, it’s no wonder that more people have gone solar in the last two years than the last twenty years combined!  A portion of these new systems were not purchased by homeowners however. Companies like Sun Run and Solar City offer the benefits of solar without the upfront cost of the system through the contracted sale of solar electricity in what is known as a solar power purchase agreement, or solar PPA.  A solar PPA brings a mini-power plant right to a home-owner’s roof, so there is no additional charge for delivery, which usually accounts for as much as 40% of an average electricity bill.  No delivery charges plus savings from federal and state rebates drive the cost down, making solar electricity rates cheaper than the majority of grid rates.  For more information on these agreements and how they work, see this informative article about SPPAs . Up until recently, homeowners have had no choice when it comes to buying power.   Customers sign up for an indefinite PPA with their local utility when they move in to a new residence and watch their electricity bills increase every year.  Now homeowners have the option to buy their own power plant and create electricity on-site or defer the ownership of the same system to a solar services provider, in which case they tack on another utility bill but potentially protect themselves from electricity rate hikes. So which option will work best for you?  That depends on several factors, including your own values in regards to ownership.  Put simply, for those who don’t have the up-front capital to invest in their own system, the SPPA may make more sense as long as the combination of their post-solar utility bill and the solar bill is less than what they were paying on the pre-solar utility bill.   If ownership is important to you, but funds are still a factor, there are financing options available which will result in a monthly payment towards the purchase of the system.   This purchase option ends up looking very similar to a system lease,...

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