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Glendale Rebate Program
Jul25

Glendale Rebate Program

They say that luck favors the prepared.   If you’re a Glendale resident interested in generating your power from the sun or already have a PV array shining on your roof, then start getting prepared, because as of today, July 25, the city has released applications for one of the most generous solar lottery rebate programs seen this side of the continent for 2016.   “We’re already seeing a lot of systems being installed, but would like to encourage more” said Aneta Badalian a Business Accounts Representative for Glendale Water and Power.       The Glendale Residential and Small Business Solar Solutions Program offers a $1.39 per a Watt rebate for 30KW systems or less. The incentive is based on a resident’s historical usage from the previous year, so if someone has a larger system and didn’t use all its generated power, they will only receive money back for the power they used. If a resident is drawn for the rebate, the payments will be capped at 50% of the total solar install cost, or up to $100,000.   The application process which was made available today, will be a two week window of submission starting August 1st. When that window closes, the city will hold a lottery, prioritizing project numbers in the order they are drawn.   The city will then work its way down the list, giving out incentives for installed systems that meet the program guidelines until its $1.5 million in funding for residents is depleted. The city as earmarked an additional $500,000 in funding for commercial projects.   Glendale expects the number of applicants for the lottery will probably be lower than the average annual rebate for solar applications, which totals around 1,000.   To be considered for the incentive, a homeowner needs to have a Home Energy Save Audit completed by the Glendale Water and Power for where the system is or will be installed. Following this either the homeowner or contractor will then have to submit documents on the system such as its interconnection to the grid, purchase or lease cost, site and line diagrams and other data.   Once Glendale approves an applicant for the incentive, the city will begin cutting checks, which should take between 6-8 weeks to arrive.   PROGRAM CONTACT INFO 818 – 548...

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Why home solar works better than solar power plants
May27

Why home solar works better than solar power plants

If you’re thinking about making the switch to clean energy, but are waiting for a community solar farm to pop up in your area or a utility company to construct a massive project that harvests the sun, might want to think again.   But first, let’s talk about Blockbuster. Remember them? That blue and yellow chain of video rental stores that could be found in nearly every suburban neighborhood in the 90s?     Yeah, I barely do, either. And that’s because when the internet changed the way people consumed movies, the behemoth company stubbornly refused to shift its model of distribution.     With the conversion rates of people switching to solar becoming more common across the globe, we’ve begun to notice a similar flub on the part of large scale solar production plants.      While these grand undertakings are exponentially better for the environment than their carbon emitting alternatives, recent problems with such projects prove the energy source is much better suited to be captured by autonomous individuals than in concentrated areas on large tracts of land.   This past March a sector of Ivanpah, one of the world’s largest solar power plants, emphasized this point as it went up in flames.     With nearly 200,000 sets of focused mirrors superheating steam to generate electricity and tons of small moving parts, it was a difficult (and expensive) project to keep running smoothly. Add to this the sprawling 3,500 acres of land it takes to house the plant and you’ve racked up a bill costing nearly 20 cents per a kilowatt hour.   Photovoltaic home solar systems on the other hand are much more scalable, only require rooftops or backyards as necessary real estate and have the advantage of making electricity where it is used–reducing its kilowatt per hour cost down to 6 cents or less.   When it comes to solar, it’s not hard to imagine a future where the outdated energy production models of the 20th century have gone the way of Blockbuster, and the companies that come out on top are the ones that shift their thinking about how the public produces, access and consumes electricity....

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Hillary Clinton’s Sunny Side
Apr26

Hillary Clinton’s Sunny Side

As the dust for the 2016 presidential primaries settles, we’re left with three likely White House hopefuls–Trump, Clinton and Sanders–whose views on solar could steer industry policies in different directions. Earlier this month we reviewed the republican front runner Donald Trump’s inimical position towards renewable power, which is in stark contrast his possible democratic challengers Hillary Clinton or Bernie Sanders. This week we’ll look at the Democratic party front runner, Hillary Clinton, who has aligned herself as a champion of the sun: To start, there’s her ambitious vision to produce enough clean energy to power all homes by 2027. The plan, a free PDF of which can be found by googling “Hillary Clinton Green Energy Plan”, calls for installing more than half a billion solar panels on homes by the end of her first term. It will also “aggressively” seek to extend Obama’s Clean Power Plan, cutting carbon emissions from power plants and aiming to reduce the country’s overall emissions to 30% of its 2005 levels.  The United States currently generates about 21 gigawatts of solar energy. To deliver on her goals, Clinton aims to bring this number to 140 gigawatts by 2020–more than double the industry’s projected growth should it stay on its current course: Clinton’s voting record and public tweets leave little room to doubt she will be a much more favorable candidate for the clean energy sector than her opponent Trump; though her party opponent, Sanders, has a track record that proves him to be as (if not more) favorable an...

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BP Solar’s 230w solar panel

I’m not a big fan of BP Solar panels ever since BP’s CEO bashed on solar power technology and their solar panels caught on fire due to a faulty junction box. The big oil company continues to push their solar division further offering their own version of a 230w solar panel called the Endura series. The solar panel has a smaller power tolerance range of +3/-3 and has a lower voltage therefore higher current which drives the increased efficiency. The BP Solar 3230N is a 60 cell polycrystalline solar panel with a potted junction box that includes six bypass diodes that improve heat management according to the company. The frame of the 3230N is unique due its “tubular” shape which increased the solar panels ability to handle higher loads. What do you think about BP Solar...

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solar panels manufactured by bpsolar catches fire

I’ve heard a few cases about bpsolar panels catching on fire on rooftops, today we add another story to the book. Recently, a bpsolar panel caught on fire in Germany on top of a warehouse. The faulty equipment was provided by BPSolar about 5 years ago and the owner of the building says the fire started in the middle of the solar panel array and spread to the wooden beams of the building according to the UK TimesOnline. BPSolar and independent third parties have launched investigations behind the cause of the fire. A few years back, BPSolar made changes to their solar panels by replacing the junction box since it was overheating. I wanted to let you know about case about the bpsolar panel catching on fire not make you think that solar panels are unsafe but to point out some brands of solar panels have a better track record than others. In my opinion, studying the history of bpsolar panels they are not the best manufacturer in the market compared to others that have a sucessful track record to performance and saftey. What do you think about BPSolar...

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