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Glendale Rebate Program
Jul25

Glendale Rebate Program

They say that luck favors the prepared.   If you’re a Glendale resident interested in generating your power from the sun or already have a PV array shining on your roof, then start getting prepared, because as of today, July 25, the city has released applications for one of the most generous solar lottery rebate programs seen this side of the continent for 2016.   “We’re already seeing a lot of systems being installed, but would like to encourage more” said Aneta Badalian a Business Accounts Representative for Glendale Water and Power.       The Glendale Residential and Small Business Solar Solutions Program offers a $1.39 per a Watt rebate for 30KW systems or less. The incentive is based on a resident’s historical usage from the previous year, so if someone has a larger system and didn’t use all its generated power, they will only receive money back for the power they used. If a resident is drawn for the rebate, the payments will be capped at 50% of the total solar install cost, or up to $100,000.   The application process which was made available today, will be a two week window of submission starting August 1st. When that window closes, the city will hold a lottery, prioritizing project numbers in the order they are drawn.   The city will then work its way down the list, giving out incentives for installed systems that meet the program guidelines until its $1.5 million in funding for residents is depleted. The city as earmarked an additional $500,000 in funding for commercial projects.   Glendale expects the number of applicants for the lottery will probably be lower than the average annual rebate for solar applications, which totals around 1,000.   To be considered for the incentive, a homeowner needs to have a Home Energy Save Audit completed by the Glendale Water and Power for where the system is or will be installed. Following this either the homeowner or contractor will then have to submit documents on the system such as its interconnection to the grid, purchase or lease cost, site and line diagrams and other data.   Once Glendale approves an applicant for the incentive, the city will begin cutting checks, which should take between 6-8 weeks to arrive.   PROGRAM CONTACT INFO 818 – 548...

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Arizona: Last call for solar?
Jul14

Arizona: Last call for solar?

Opposition to the solar industry in Arizona by its largest privatized public utility company could effectively eliminate monetary incentives for homeowners that aren’t grandfathered in under current rates.   For the past three years, Arizona Public Service has fought relentlessly to either eliminate or reduce net-metering credits and incur additional costs on solar homeowners in the state.   This past July the company filed for a solar rate review with the Arizona Corporation Commission (ACC), increasing new solar homeowner’s bill by an average of $133 and seeking to end net-metering.   What separates APS’s recent efforts from attempts in the past, is that it has positioned politicians into some of the five elected seats on the ACC.   The move, however, did not go unnoticed: State news outlets slammed the ACC for its allegedly shading dealings, bringing it under scrutiny from the FBI.   Still, if history is any indication, it’s that the APS is not one to back down. In 2013, the utility company was the first successful one in the United States to impose discriminatory charges on solar customers. Sources indicate that the APS’s current attack has a good chance of getting its desired legislation moved through the ACC, all current commissioners, of which, are Republicans.   If there is a bright side to this dark period Arizona solar homeowners are facing, it’s that the proposed bill would not be retroactive. This means that changes to the state’s net metering and additional rates would not go into effect until July 2017, giving solar homeowners and homeowners thinking of changing to solar the chance to be grandfathered in under the old benefits for 20...

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Burbank residents can make bank on extended rebates
Jul07

Burbank residents can make bank on extended rebates

In an effort to inspire solar savvy residents to generate more power during afternoon hours, the city of Burbank, CA has rolled out a new solar rebate program that lasts until July 31 and gives money to homeowners if they point their panels westward. In the Northern Hemisphere, south facing panels produce 10% more electricity than their west facing counterparts. As the sun sets in the evening, however, west facing solar arrays are able to milk the last of the sun’s rays and produce more electricity during the critical hours of 4-7pm, when Burbank’s energy consumption is at its peak. This graph illustrates the difference of solar energy production on March 31, 2016: To qualify for the Burbank’s rebate program in California, a home’s panels need to fall within the span of 200-270 degrees and have a minimum tilt of 5 degrees. If you’re a solar homeowner or considering becoming one in California, the city allows rebates for portions of systems that meet its requirements. You can go to this link to find out how much money the city will give you. Like the majority of rebate programs, this one is open only for a short time, until the end of the month or when funding is exhausted. You can start the rebate process by emailing Burbank’s Solar Support program manager, Alfred Antoun...

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Bernies Love For Solar Burns Brightest
Apr28

Bernies Love For Solar Burns Brightest

  Of the three presidential candidates hoping to secure the oval office in 2016, Bernie Sanders’ advocacy of solar initiatives outshines his competitors Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.   As for the latter, Mr. Trump, who believes that climate change is a conspiracy theory and has publicized his dislike of clean energy, the policy agendas between him and Sanders are flagrant; while the differences between Sanders and his party opponent Clinton are less obvious, though still substantial.   Both Sanders and Clinton have publicized plans to transition the country’s energy from fossil fuels to renewable options, but unlike Clinton, Sanders’ plan openly opposes the fossil fuel industry by aiming to rid politics of corporate lobbyists, ban fracking and exploration for oil on public lands. Clinton, on the other hand, whose campaign has taken money from the fossil fuel industry, has avoided outright attacks on it, instead focusing on large government incentives to urge more people to convert to solar.   A look at both candidates’ plans reveals that Sanders is much more detailed when it comes to how he aims to steer Americans to become 100 percent dependent on renewable energy. He also, touches on issues such as bringing the United States’ transportation emissions to zero and taking a much more aggressive position in the global theater to reduce greenhouse gasses–all of which are absent on Clinton’s side.   Sanders’ past political initiatives leave little room for doubt that he will fight for his vision. In 2015 he introduced the Low Income Solar Act, which would provide $200 million in loans and grants through the Department of Energy to make solar more accessible to low-income families and communities.   Then there’s the fact that the environmental super PAC Climate Hawks listed Sanders as the No. 1 climate leader in the Senate for the 113th Congress and endorsed him as its choice for president.   Though Sanders is currently trailing in the primary elections behind Clinton, his efforts have given voice to millions of supporters that are not shy to demand better environmental policies from their government.        ...

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Hillary Clinton’s Sunny Side
Apr26

Hillary Clinton’s Sunny Side

As the dust for the 2016 presidential primaries settles, we’re left with three likely White House hopefuls–Trump, Clinton and Sanders–whose views on solar could steer industry policies in different directions. Earlier this month we reviewed the republican front runner Donald Trump’s inimical position towards renewable power, which is in stark contrast his possible democratic challengers Hillary Clinton or Bernie Sanders. This week we’ll look at the Democratic party front runner, Hillary Clinton, who has aligned herself as a champion of the sun: To start, there’s her ambitious vision to produce enough clean energy to power all homes by 2027. The plan, a free PDF of which can be found by googling “Hillary Clinton Green Energy Plan”, calls for installing more than half a billion solar panels on homes by the end of her first term. It will also “aggressively” seek to extend Obama’s Clean Power Plan, cutting carbon emissions from power plants and aiming to reduce the country’s overall emissions to 30% of its 2005 levels.  The United States currently generates about 21 gigawatts of solar energy. To deliver on her goals, Clinton aims to bring this number to 140 gigawatts by 2020–more than double the industry’s projected growth should it stay on its current course: Clinton’s voting record and public tweets leave little room to doubt she will be a much more favorable candidate for the clean energy sector than her opponent Trump; though her party opponent, Sanders, has a track record that proves him to be as (if not more) favorable an...

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California’s Net Metering 1.0 – Government Incentives Are About To End
Apr11

California’s Net Metering 1.0 – Government Incentives Are About To End

If you live in California, the sun is about to set on your chance to take advantage of the best government solar incentive program we’re ever likely to see. This is not a drill! The state’s 1.0 incentive program will expire when the total amount of Net Metering for its three major utility companies (PG&E, So Cal Edison and SDG&E) reaches more than 5% of its customers’ peak power needs. And while you can see the Monthly Net Metering 1.0 Program 5% limit is about to be reached…   …the good news is that if your home or business has it’s solar energy system interconnected before the cap, you’ll be grandfathered into the NEM 1.0 incentive program from 20 years.   That’s 20 years!   To pass up a chance like this is similar to passing up the chance to purchase acres of land for pennies back in the day on the government’s 1862 Homestead Act. This is because the current government wants people to go green.   The Net Metering program rewards homes and businesses for using solar energy by giving them credits on their electricity bill.   The Net Metering 1.0 incentive allows people to earn credits at the same rate the utility companies charge for electricity.   So if your utility company charges about $0.15 per a KW and your home generates 1,500 KW, you’d get $225 paid to you by the utility company to either offset your utility bill, help pay off your solar installation or buy that man cheetah outfit you’ve been dreaming of: The soon to be engaged NEM 2.0 incentive program is a 124 page document that imposes time-of-use rates for Net Metered customers, decreasing the amount of compensation energy companies will pay in accordance with the time customers generate excess energy.   While California is one of a few states that’s sided more in the favor of the solar industry, other states, like Arizona, whose Net Metering 1.0 incentives are also set to expire haven’t been so lucky.   Whatever the future of Net Metering may hold, it’s a sure bet incentives, while still remaining fair, may never be as good as they are now.      ...

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