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Home solar: To buy or to lease, that is the question?
Dec05

Home solar: To buy or to lease, that is the question?

Africa, India, Australia, England, The Netherlands, The Middle East, America — large scale solar farms are beginning to take root around the world. Industrial sized sun mining operations like the one in Morocco and Southern India are now seen as a viable and more cost effective alternative to oil, even in some of the more oil rich nations. As the trend continues to take off, it’s worth exploring the idea of whether it’s better to install your own panels or purchase the cleaner and cheaper energy from a large utility scale operation. Firstly, who doesn’t love their independence. When you home is able to generate its own power, you don’t have to bow to the fickle whims of a utility company every time they decide to raise the rates. Another benefit of installing your own solar is that through net-metering programs and federal income tax breaks, you’re able to recoup much of the installation costs and completely pay off your system in a matter of years, enjoying monthly energy bills where the energy company might be paying you (with credits) rather than the other way around. For many people who don’t own their own homes, renting solar makes sense. However, for those that do own the deed to their houses, the decision to install their own system is worth the extra work and pays much better in the long term. Contact GoGreenSolar.com or call (888) 338-0183 to learn if your home is a good candidate to convert to...

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Oregon lawmakers aim to extend state tax credits for solar
Nov28

Oregon lawmakers aim to extend state tax credits for solar

Oregon lawmakers recently voiced their intent to extend the state’s Renewable Energy Tax Credit (RETC) for an extra two years, according to the Portland Business Journal. The RETC, which currently allows Oregon homeowners to get up to a $6000 tax credit for installing a photovoltaic system, is set to expire at the end of this year. Due to the program’s success in stimulating homeowners to switch to renewable energy, however, the Joint Interim Committee on Department of Energy Oversight (DEO) decided that suddenly pulling the plug on the incentive would not be beneficial for the state’s environment or renewable energy economy. “There was some real uncertainty about abruptly ending the program and just pulling the plug on the good things that are happening,” the PBJ quoted Committee co-chair Rep. Paul Holvey. Over the past several years, the DEO has reduced the cost of its incentive program from $3 per a watt to half that without seeing a change in consumer demand. Solar advocates are seeking to align future solar incentives in the state with the federal Investment Tax Credit, which allows homeowners to write-off up to 30% of the cost of their home solar installation. The federal ITC was recently extended by a bipartisan vote in congress and its rates are set to incrementally decline to 26% in 2020 and to 22% the following three years. The combination of Oregon’s state incentive, combined with the federal ITC and the declining material costs for a PV system will likely make the price tag of switching over to solar the cheapest it’s likely to be for the next few...

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Americans Overwhelmingly Love Solar
Nov15

Americans Overwhelmingly Love Solar

What has a higher approval rating in America than kittens and apple pie? According to a survey by The Pew Research Center: Solar power. Last month a survey conducted by the research center found that an overwhelming 89 percent of voting age citizens in the US want to see the solar industry expand. Considering the forecasted shift in the wake of the 2016 elections of putting more legislative power in the hands of states, many solar advocates are guardedly optimistic that the industry will continue to see growth despite having a climate change denier in charge as the country’s commander-in-chief. “People want more solar; they want more solar business in their state,” Scott Hennessey, the head federal lobbyist for SolarCity Corp recently stated to The Hill. Besides the promise of guilt free energy (as far as CO2 levels in the environment are concerned), the solar industry is responsible for creating one out of 83 jobs in America, according to the Solar Foundation. What these numbers supporting solar expansion equate to is increased pressure on the federal government to uphold its pledge to the investment tax credit (ITC), which recently got an extension to 2019 and has aided the industry’s growth by allowing solar homeowners to deduct up to 30 percent of the installation costs from their federal taxes. So while solar is on a health trajectory to continue its continental expansion, the window for securing more lucrative solar incentives at the federal level might not stay open as long as people hoped. To find out how you can write off 30 percent of your home solar installation before the ITC expires, contact GoGreenSolar.com or call (888)...

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What a Trump Presidency Means For Solar
Nov14

What a Trump Presidency Means For Solar

In the wake of the 2016 presidential elections, there’s been endless speculation on what the future of solar energy will look like in America. With President elect Trump soon at the helm of our country’s clean energy policies, it doesn’t seem like over reacting to assume the worst–to envision an America where oil derricks, pipelines and fracking operations spread from coast to coast like a black mold and renewable energies like solar and wind are all but consumed in smog choked inferno. After all, this is the same candidate who is on record claiming that climate change is a hoax, who has a trail of legal battles with environmental groups over constructing his hotels and golf courses and whose lead choice for the head of the EPA is fellow climate change denier Myron Ebell. But in spite of these dangerous patterns by our soon to be leader in chief, many analysts believe the renewable energy sector will continue to grow remain on its path to overtaking the fossil fuel industry, and here’s why: THE STATES HAVE SPOKEN: Donald Trump has made it no secret that while he doesn’t care much for environmental policies, he has an even less favorable view on federal oversight. That means that while his administration will be seeking ways to lesson the federal  government’s role in promoting clean energy, states will be given more leeway to create and enforce their own clean energy policies. If this election has given any indication as to which direction these policies might trend, a look at the promising outcomes on propositions in Florida and Nevada, might give reason for some guarded optimism. In both states the controlling utility companies spent millions of dollars and fought hard to decrease subsidies to homeowners seeking solar only to be defeated on the ballots. THE COST OF SOLAR IS DECLINING: While sound bites and video clips have inundated our lives with politicians making bigger than life promises regarding the future of energy in America, the truth is that at its core, the energy sector is controlled by market forces and consumer demand–and there’s nothing more enticing for a consumer than paying less for a superior product. Over the past two decades the cost of energy per a KW hour from solar has been on a rapid decline and will win on its own merits (especially with current incentives, but even without). Utilities around the country have been shuttering coal plants in favor of cheaper energy alternatives and it’s no accident that the solar industry has overtaken the coal industry in the number of people it employs. FEDERAL SOLAR INVESTMENT TAX CREDITS ARE ATTAINABLE...

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National cost of solar installation might be as low as it can go
Oct13

National cost of solar installation might be as low as it can go

It’s likely the cost of switching to rooftop solar might be nearing its lowest possible point the market will allow according to a recent report from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The LBNL’s Tracking The Sun IX report illustrates that the the costs of home solar installations declined again in 2015, though not as dramatically in years past. While the soft cost of solar installation has been quickly decreasing, performance based incentives such as state utility rebates and net metering programs are on a trend to becoming less generous. The good news is that while many of the revised government incentive programs across America are still being discussed, quick actors are still able to slide into the programs before their windows close. Such people will reap the dual benefits of PV technology with better efficiency and at lower costs than in years past, compounded with the offsets from the state and federal...

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California upholds rates and proves a shining beacon for home-solar benefits
Oct04

California upholds rates and proves a shining beacon for home-solar benefits

In a major win for residential solar in California this month, the state’s Public Utilities Commission rejected attempts by Southern California Edison, Pacific Gas & Electric and San Diego Gas & Electric to make rooftop solar more expensive. The 3 to 1 decision against the investor-owned utility companies brings to close a three year battle where these companies lobbied to significantly lower the net metering rates paid to solar residents. Currently the private utility companies have to compensate solar powered homeowners and businesses for the excess electricity they supply back to the grid. Like many private utility companiess rallying against net metering in America these days, they claimed the payout to people generating their own solar power would increase the rates they charged non-solar residents. In a scathing condemnation to the Palm Springs Desert Sun, the policy director for the California Solar energy Industries Association Brad Heavner, called the utility company’s case “not that strong” at all, claiming the vigor with which they attacked home solar was “almost harassment.” Part of the utility company’s appeal for commissioners to review the low rates for solar residents was the extension of a 30 percent tax credit issued by Congress earlier this year for solar installations past the end of 2016. Anti-solar advocates argued the tax credit makes rooftop solar cheaper than it otherwise would have been and that the utility companies should no longer need to provide such generous net-metering compensation. While the state’s commission currently ruled in favor of upholding the favorable net-metering rates, keeping the cost of installing home solar at a historic low, commissioners are set to review the policy again in...

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