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SoCal Edison Net Metering 1.0 Expires June 30th 2017!
May08

SoCal Edison Net Metering 1.0 Expires June 30th 2017!

Avoid Upcoming Changes to California Electricity Rates! Net Metering 1.0 is straight forward: the electric company measures how much energy you use from the grid and how much energy your solar panels put back into the grid. Customers are only charged the net amount, and if you export more than you consume, you would get paid for the extra energy produced! However, Southern California Edison is now in the process of initiating NEM (Net Energy Metering) 2.0, which is based on TOU (Time of Use), and you will be charged higher rates for energy usage during peak hours. This means that if you wait to go solar, you’re going to get less money for your extra power! The good news is that you still have a chance to avoid these upcoming changes. NEM 2.0 starts once Southern California Energy reaches a cap in energy usage for NEM 1.0 on June 30th 2017. If you install solar panels before the NEM 1.0 list fills up, you are guaranteed a spot on the original NEM program plan for 20 years past your original interconnection date. That means now is the perfect time to install solar – before these new changes go into effect! Those interested in solar panels need to install as soon as possible, because there is limited space left on the NEM 1.0 list – and your panels need to be installed and approved before the list fills up. Every moment that you wait to install solar, you risk missing out on 20 years’ worth of savings! Contact GoGreenSolar today to find out how we can save you thousands of dollars. One of our friendly solar professionals will conduct a free analysis of your roof and provide a proposal for your own customized solar system. Call (866) 798-4435 or visit us at www.GoGreenSolar.com...

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The New StorEdge from SolarEdge
May05

The New StorEdge from SolarEdge

How does StorEdge compare to existing battery solutions? Fewer components, less expensive, easier to install, better Tech Support, more mature product line. Here is a typical StorEdge installation: Features that make StorEdge better: A)  All of the StorEdge components (including the LG Chem battery) are exterior rated.  The Sonnen is interior rated only. Most people do not have room in their garage for a Sonnen cabinet, let alone in their living room as shown in their brochures. B)  The StorEdge inverter is the solar inverter.  Sonnen recharges from the grid, and requires the addition of solar equipment.  The battery bank has the same high DC voltage and low amps as a solar array, so the inverter can easily invert the DC power to AC; whether it is coming from the solar array or battery. C) StorEdge allows the homeowner to install solar now (to cut utility bills) and add the battery later.  Sonnen is grid-tie battery backup only.  Solar is NOT included. D) StorEdge has the ability to perform Zero Export (do NOT backfeed the grid, self-consumption only) which is required for homeowners in Hawaii.  Sonnen can NOT perform this function and requires the solar equipment, such as a SolarEdge install, to do it. Technical Details: Many people wanting battery storage are familiar with the traditional 48v battery banks, but the StorEdge design is very different from the traditional 48V battery storage system. Anybody with a SolarEdge 7600 that wants to add battery storage can get it with an Autoformer and a LG Chem battery. The StorEdge marketing still makes a lot of noise about Powerwall 1 and 2 being compatible (which they are) but Powerwalls are NOT available to us through our distributors, so they are off the radar for DIY installs.  The LG Chem is a very good battery made by a bankable company.  They don’t have the media hype of Tesla, but it is every bit as good.  I have seen the LG battery up-close and personal, and they did a nice job on the enclosure. Here’s what makes the StorEdge design better: 1)  The 350v of DC power coming from the Optimizers is fed DIRECTLY into the battery. Note: In a traditional 48v battery system (such as the Sonnen), there is an Inverter/Charger that reduces the 350v to 48v.  Eliminating this step simplifies the design, and is more efficient since there is no conversion loss as the Charge Controller circuits adjust the output power.  It also eliminates an expensive piece of equipment, reducing the system price-point; as well as eliminating a point of failure.  Moreover, an Inverter/Charger is generally expected to last 5+ years.  Conversely, the StorEdge inverter life expectancy is 12 years...

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Solar Tax Credits in New Mexico Might Have a Bright New Future
Jan27

Solar Tax Credits in New Mexico Might Have a Bright New Future

A bipartisan effort by New Mexico legislators supported bills in the House and Senate to revive the state’s solar tax credit, which expired last year in 2016. The endorsed bill aims to renew the state’s solar incentive credits for an additional eight years, gradually being reduced from 10 percent to 5 percent by 2025. “New Mexico is known for its abundant sunshine, yet Arizona and Colorado have more solar-related businesses, jobs and installation capacity than we do,” Fox Business News quoted Republican Rep. Sarah Maestas Barnes, a sponsor of the legislation. Since New Mexico’s previous tax credit had expired in 2016, the state saw a sudden drop of employment and revenue generated by solar installations. Over the tax credit’s eight year lifespan, people installing solar had spent over $40 million on labor, spurring nearly a quarter billion dollars of related investments and economic growth. For legislators and constituents, the promise of invigorating the state’s economy during these sluggish times was well worth the $5 million annual price tag of funding the incentive program. As an added bonus for residents considering switching to solar, a drastic reduction in the price of materials has nearly halved the cost per a watt from $9 in 2009 to $4.52 in 2016 with the tax credit program. A combination of New Mexico’s latest solar incentive and record low costs for solar materials will surely generate some of the lowest solar costs residents of the state have ever seen–but only for those that manage to secure the new tax credit before its funding cap is reached and applications fill up. If you’d like to learn how you can snatch up New Mexico’s newest incentive program contact GoGreenSolar via email or call (888) 338-0183....

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Is New Jersey’s latest solar incentive bill too baller?
Jan18

Is New Jersey’s latest solar incentive bill too baller?

A recently passed solar incentive bill to promote residential solar in New Jersey and cut down on grid congestion has recently come under fire for being too generous. New Jersey Rate Counsel DIrector Stefanie Brand critiqued Bill A441 for being “too rich” insofar that it offers large payouts to homeowners for making the switch to solar. Bill A441, which the New Jersey Assembly Telecommunications and Utilities Committee voted in favor of this January, offers up to 15% reimbursement on residential solar arrays to homeowners in certain areas of the state. The bill designates five strategic zones in New Jersey that would benefit from reduced grid congestion if more people installed solar panels on their roof. “Families choosing to use solar panels are cutting energy costs, and most importantly, moving the state toward a greener, more environmentally responsible future,’’ the NJSpotLight quoted Assemblyman Tim Eustace (D-Bergen), the bill’s sponsor. In the past, electrical congestion in New Jersey ended up costing consumers up to $1 billion. If the bill passes, it will seek to reduce such congestion and forgo having foot New Jersey constituents with the bill of installing more power-lines by encouraging enough people in the congested areas to switch to...

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New Lodi City solar rebates finer than its wines
Jan09

New Lodi City solar rebates finer than its wines

The California city of Lodi, fondly known as the “Zinfandel Capital of the World”, just added another variety to its merits–but this time, instead of wine, it is turning heads with its latest solar rebate program. The sundrenched San Joaquin County city is offering residents up to $5,000 in solar rebates for new Photovoltaic system applications that are approved between Jan 3 to 31, 2017. The rebate program, which according to city’s website is meant to “incentivize the installation of high-quality solar PV systems” has a $185,000 budget. The price tag would theoretically allow nearly half of Lodi’s population to get massive financial incentives for going solar. Requirements for the rebates set forth by Lodi Electric Utility (LEU) mandate a system must produce the same amount or less than the home’s previous year of energy usage. To determine your home’s annual energy usage you can check out this helpful link provided by the city. Lodi City Council and LEU announced the program earlier this year to take advantage of the 2006 Senate Bill 1 (SB1), establishing a California goal to add 3,000 MW of new solar systems to the state in over 10 years. Once the city exhausts its rebate budget, rebates will then be determined on a lottery basis. Go Green Solar is an appropriately licensed contractor in accordance with rules and regulations adopted by the State of California Contractors State Licensing Board (CSLB) and City Building Codes and can help you install PV modules, inverters, and meters listed on the California Energy Commission’s (CEC) Eligible Equipment List for the rebate. Call (888) 338-0183 today to figure out how you can receive the full amount of the city’s offered rebate and save up enough money for those extra crates of...

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Why 2017 might be the best year ever to go solar
Jan04

Why 2017 might be the best year ever to go solar

Despite the anticipated pushback against environmental policies by incoming President Trump and his fossil fuel friendly cabinet picks in 2017, a glance at this past year’s renewable industry trends and plummeting panel prices suggest that right now might be the cheapest time ever to switch to solar before policy changes and a slowdown in manufacturing drive costs back up.   Last year(s) for the Full Extended Solar Investment Tax Credit   The Solar Investment Tax Credit (ITC) is one of the corner stone pieces of nation wide legislation supporting the development of solar in the United States. In a nutshell, the ITC is a 30 percent tax credit for solar systems on residential and commercial properties. It was set to expire this year, but a rare act of bipartisan policy making extended it to 2023. The tax credit incentive will decline by a set percentage every year until its extended expiration date, with 2017 being the last year people can receive the full 30 percent write off. But let’s not be optimistic for a minute and assume the incoming Trump administration were to try and abolish this credit. There’s a dull silver lining in the fact that our government is a large machine that takes some time to change course, meaning that any potential changes might not take effect until a year or two down the line.   A Sudden Plunge in Hardware Costs   We’ve all heard the investment maxim “buy low sell high”–well, when it comes to the hardware costs of solar, it’s possible things are as low as they’re likely to get. At the end of 2016, Dec 28 saw the market price of solar panels fall by an additional 2.4% to $0.36 a watt according to PVinsights The plunge was due to an over manufacturing of panels and a lower than expected surge in demand. To move inventory, many manufacturer’s such a China’s Trina Solar Ltd. are most likely selling at a loss. The Fossil Fuel Industry is Fighting Back   2016 was a record year for solar. Domestically, utility-scale solar additions totalled 9.5 GW according to the US Energy Information Association, more than any single energy source–even fossil fuels! Globally, renewables fared even better, with the cost of solar and wind the same price or cheaper than new fossil fuel capacity in more than 30 countries according to a World Economic Forum report in Dec 2016. The report points out that as prices continue to fall two-thirds of all nations will reach a point know as “grid parity” even without subsidies. “Renewable energy has reached a tipping point,” Michael Drexler, who leads infrastructure and...

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