Call (888) 338-0183 or click here for solar pricing


5 Cheap DIY Energy Fixes
Apr29

5 Cheap DIY Energy Fixes

The hot months of summer come upon us like an uncomfortable rash, sending us scurrying around looking for a solution. However, turning up the AC isn’t always the best option. Here are a few energy fixes and tips that could save you money and keep you cool all year long. Get Comfortable at Home Image via Flickr by RLHyde Dressing down at home is just common sense. Change into the lightest clothing you can wear, and get cozy. It’s your house, after all. When you wear lighter clothing you might even think your warm house is a bit chilly. However, even if it’s too warm for you, you won’t have to drop the temperature nearly as much in short shorts and a tank as you would need to in thick jeans and a cardigan. Common Sense With Windows In the evenings you should keep your windows open and enjoy the draft, that is, as long as you have a screen. The screen will keep the bugs out, making the fragrant breeze a nice change from electrical drafts that don’t smell like fresh flowers. As important as it is to keep your windows open from evening to morning, it is just as important to keep them tightly shut from morning to night. Day time heat can be overwhelming. It fills a house with humidity and a dense sensation of oppressive heat. Just a Few Degrees of Comfort By turning your thermostat up just two degrees you can save a lot of money every month of summer. Just two degrees makes a world of difference for your energy bill. However, two degrees isn’t much for your body. So, if you think you like your house at 68, kick it up to 70 and see if you even feel the difference: most likely the only change you’ll notice is the drastic drop in your electrical bill. Choke Your Chimney Today Make sure the seal on your chimney is good and tight, even if it means asking a tough young neighbor over to choke it for you. This overlooked seal often causes a large hole in your pocket every month by leaking cold air. When the winter months are over and you’re sure there won’t be another indoor fire all year, then it’s time to seal the chimney. Make sure you have it done every year and you could save hundreds in runaway cooler air. Check Your Seals Along with your chimney you need to have every seal checked annually. Leaking window seals can cost you more than two degrees a month! By having someone scan your house for these temperature leaks you...

Read More
Conserve Energy & Reduce Your Heating Bill (Infographic)
Apr02

Conserve Energy & Reduce Your Heating Bill (Infographic)

Cook with the Sun! Another way to conserve energy is to cook with the Sun.  Solar cookers can cook, bake, dehydrate, or boil without using any traditional form of energy.    Cooking your food with solar energy locks in moisture and prevents burning and scorching that you often experience with conventional ovens.   All American SUN OVEN®      Sample Cooking Times     Beef Roast, 2.5 lbs = 1 hour, 20 minutes Baked Chicken, 3 lbs = 1 hour, 15 minutes Bread = 45 minutes Rice = 40 minutes Chocolate Cake = 35 minutes       Granola = 20...

Read More
How to Save Energy
Feb20

How to Save Energy

Installing a photovoltaic system will help you offset your electric bill, but there are plenty of practical steps homeowners can take to reduce energy...

Read More
NFL “Green Energy” Infographic
Feb04

NFL “Green Energy” Infographic

Read More

How do Modern Building Designs Promote Energy Efficiency?

While architecture for many years was solely related to the appearance of a building, there have been many changes in recent years. Given the level of environmental awareness that we are all now expected to have, modern architecture is reflective of this. Today’s new buildings are greener and more energy efficient than ever before. We looked at how modern designs promote this new outlook, and what the long-term impacts and results will be.  Location Location No, there isn’t a glut of buildings under construction in a particular part of the world because it has more exposure to sunlight or wind. However, the location of buildings in terms of how they are constructed plays a central role in determining energy efficiency, especially when it comes to relying on solar power. A building that faces the south, for example, can expect to enjoy more natural light than it otherwise would. These buildings can therefore benefit more from solar harnessing, should they engage in it, or a massively reduced energy bill as they wouldn’t rely on artificial light during the day. Material Gains The range of materials used in the construction industry is perhaps the biggest factor when it comes to promoting energy efficiency in new builds. In recent years, products such as ETFE, texlon, and other tensiles have become widely used as designers look to create the most environmentally friendly constructions possible. The benefits that can be enjoyed from such materials is enormous. As well as the environmental positives that lead to a huge reduction in energy usage and costs, they are also great for bringing down the actual construction costs, too. The low weight of most of these also means that the use of metals such as steel and iron has been reduced dramatically, which is another positive step. The Bigger Picture Modern building trends are moving towards completely sustainable constructions, rather than those that may have a solar roof that can heat 50% of a buildings’ water, for example. Today, initiatives such as carbon capture are high on the agenda of designers and scientists, so that any emissions buildings do create can be re-used positively. The growing use of on-site waste and water recycling practices are also combining to make buildings more efficient than ever before, with owners happy to become accountable for their carbon footprint and act accordingly to reduce this. In today’s environmentally conscious world, energy efficiency is regarded as a minimum expectation, and any aesthetic or other benefits that extend from this are seen as a welcome addition. How something looks isn’t the beginning and the end of the debate anymore, which can only be a...

Read More
How to Use a “Kill A Watt” Energy Meter
Dec05

How to Use a “Kill A Watt” Energy Meter

Want to test your household appliances to see how efficient they really are?  A Kill A Watt Energy Meter allows you to safely and accurately measure the power consumption of household appliances. You can check the amps, volts, and even see the cumulative consumption of your appliances by kilowatt-hour (kWh), which is the measurement your utility company uses on your bill.   This tool exposes those dreaded vampire loads around your house.  A vampire load is an appliance that uses energy even when they’re “turned off.”  Some of the main energy-sucking culprits in your home could be the microwave, PC, coffee maker, or television. You could have a number of these vampire loads running 24/7, costing you hundreds of dollars every year.  Anything with a digital clock is a suspect, so let’s learn how to test an appliance! This little gadget will make it easy to determine what’s costing you the most. You can set the Kill A Watt Energy Meter to measure the cost of running an appliance by adjusting this energy meter to a rate(s) that’s comparable to what your utility company charges per kWh. The Kill A Watt Energy Meter is particularly helpful for estimating the amount of energy used by appliances that cycle.  I decided to plug our refrigerator into the Kill A Watt to see just how much energy it draws.   Step 1. Plug it in To get started, plug your appliance directly into the Kill A Watt and then plug your Kill A Watt into the AC wall outlet.  Currently drawing 118.8 Volts Now you can reference the Kill A Watt’s LCD display to see the voltage (Volts) and current (Amps).  In addition to volts and amps, it’ll show you Watts (which is volts x amps), and frequency in Hz.   Over time, the Kill A Watt will rack up kilowatt-hours.  To get an idea of how much it costs to run my fridge, I have the rate set at $0.25 per kWh.   I’m presupposing that that I pay my utility company a quarter for every kilowatt-hour I use.   Step 2. Check the Clock You might want to take a note of the time you plugged it in, even though it will tally the hours that it’s connected.   Come back in a day, a week, or whenever.   Step 3. Write it Down Once the Kill A Watt has been plugged in for a while, you can read the sum of the energy your appliance consumed in kilowatt-hours. After reading the LCD display for the cumulative kWh, you can use this information to calculate the average amount of energy used by the...

Read More
Page 3 of 1112345...10...Oldest »