Call (888) 338-0183 or click here for solar pricing


Solar Energy Beyond Photovoltaics? Infographic
Sep21

Solar Energy Beyond Photovoltaics? Infographic

Using solar energy in your life can go far beyond installing a photovoltaic system on your roof. How can the Sun help you live a smarter, reduce your energy consumption, and save money? Need help designing a solar system that’s right for your home or business?  Let us know! Request a Free...

Read More
Quick Look at STC vs. PTC Ratings
Sep17

Quick Look at STC vs. PTC Ratings

What’s the differnce between STC & PTC? Looking at the specifications for a solar panel, you’re going to see two distinct ratings:  STC and PTC, both of which refer to DC (direct current) Watts of the solar panel. STC rating Standard Test Conditions, or STC ratings, are the solar panel’s name plate value.  This means that if it’s a Sharp ND-250QCS, 250 Watt solar panel, the STC rating is 250 Watts.   STC ratings reflect the solar panel’s production in ideal conditions, which is actually a flash of light shot at the solar panel in a lab environment. PTC rating When you’re looking to get an idea of PV output, PTC ratings are a more realistic number to look at.   PTC ratings, or PVUSA (Photovoltaics for Utility Systems Applications) Test Conditions, show the results from a test that more closely mimics real-world conditions.  PTC ratings are based on 1,000 Watts per square meter of solar irradiance at 10 meters above ground level, at 20 degrees Celsius, and with a wind speed of 1 meter per second. As seen in the image above, the Sharp ND-250QCS, 250W solar panel has a PTC rating of 223.6 Watts.  If you were using these solar panels for your photovoltaic system, using the PTC rating of 223.6W to estimate output would provide a more accurate, “real-world” number than the STC rating of 250W. Keep in mind that there are still other factors that will effect PV output.   There will usually be some energy loss via wires, inverters, etc.  There’s also normal degradation of solar panels over time and environmental factors such as soiling (dirt), heat, and shading....

Read More
Top Tips to Save Energy Around the House
Sep16

Top Tips to Save Energy Around the House

Likely it’s not a stretch to say you would appreciate a lower energy bill every month. You probably already engage in a variety of energy-saving practices, such as turning off the lights when not in use and hollering at your kids to stop staring blank-faced into an open refrigerator, waiting for some new options to magically appear. But, as conscious as you are, you may not know what appliances and electronics are costing you the most. The appliances that use the most energy on a ratio scale may surprise you. According to Energy.gov, your laptop only uses about 50 kilowatts per hour, while your 61-inch flat screen uses around 170, and your washer uses about 500. Meanwhile, a furnace fan, whether it is blowing heated air through your ducts or conditioned air, accounts for 12 percent of the average American’s annual residential energy costs. The biggest hogs of energy consumption are your water heater, clothes dryer and dishwasher, which use 5,500, 5,000 and 2,400 kilowatts per hour, respectively. To put that into perspective, you can wash clothes for 10 hours on the same amount of energy you use when running your dryer for one. Take These Steps While it requires extra work and may feel less luxurious, a few simple adjustments can save you a bundle of cash. Use a clothes line. According to consumerenergycenter.org, the average annual cost of running a clothes dryer is $85. Wash in cold water. The North Shore Gas Company reports that by washing your clothes using the cold-cold wash/rinse cycles, you can save up to $150 per year. Moderate home temperatures. Draw the blinds in your home on hot days, lower your air conditioner’s fan speed and keep all the filters and registers clean. Porky Little Energy Bandits National Geographic Daily News reported in August that there are three energy hogs lurking in your home that leech electricity from the grid even when you aren’t using them. N.G. reports that there are six primary energy bandits that you probably aren’t even aware of: Set-Top Boxes – Not only do they deliver cable or satellite TV into your home and tell you what time it is, set-top boxes function like computers and constantly communicate with remote content sources even when they (and your television) are off. Visit bundle.tv and other satellite providers to see what kind of boxes with energy-saving features are available. Microwaves – These appliances continue to sap energy off the line even when they aren’t in use in order to power the clock and the electronic push button controls. An Appliance Standards Awareness Project study found that the average microwave is...

Read More
Summer vs. Winter: Energy Consumption Infographic
Aug30
Read More
Top 5 Ways to Reduce Your Summer Electric Bill
Aug29

Top 5 Ways to Reduce Your Summer Electric Bill

1.  Invest in a programmable thermostat. Don’t blast the AC when you don’t really need it. A programmable thermostat can save you hundreds during the hot summer months. Adjust your AC for the time you spend sleeping or away from home. When you are home, set your AC a couple degrees higher than you normally might.  Try 78° F. Call us today! 1 (866) 798-4435 2.  Plant Trees & Shade Windows On the south and west sides of your home, plant fast-growing trees and close the blinds to shade windows that are exposed to the hot summer sun. Open the windows at night to cool down the house instead of using the air conditioner. 3. Find your vampire loads! Vampire loads are typical household appliances that silently suck up energy 24 hours a day. Little phantom loads like this can add up, stealing money out of your pocket. For example, your coffee maker might be using small amounts of energy to run a digital clock.   How would you know? Learn to use a Kill-A-Watt energy meter to hunt down the energy-suckers in your house. 4.  Make the switch to LED technology! About 10% of the energy you use goes towards lighting your home. One of the easiest ways to cut back your electric bill is to switch to LED Lighting. LED lights are initially more expensive, but they will pay for themselves and save you money over their long lifespan. 5.  Go Solar. Request a free solar quote today.  Going solar is a more long-term investment on future energy savings. Many utility companies have a tiered rate structure, so installing enough solar to get you out of the higher tiers will save you money for decades. Predict your savings with our solar energy savings calculator  Got Questions? Call Today! Request a Free Quote 8kW Solar System 8085 Watt Complete Solar Panel Kit, SMA Grid-Tie Inverter If you use a little more than 1000 kWh per month, an 8kW solar system will bring your net consumption to about zero. Click here to learn the pros and cons of central inverters compared with microinverters. 1 (866) 798-4435 4kW Solar System 4165 Watt Complete Solar Panel Kit, Enphase M215 Microinverters In the same scenario, using about 1000 kWh per month, a 4kW solar system will cut your electric bill in half. This system is complete with Enphase M215 microinverters to maximize...

Read More
Page 20 of 37« Newest...10...1819202122...30...Oldest »