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California’s Net Metering 1.0 – Government Incentives Are About To End

If you live in California, the sun is about to set on your chance to take advantage of the best government solar incentive program we’re ever likely to see. This is not a drill!

The state’s 1.0 incentive program will expire when the total amount of Net Metering for its three major utility companies (PG&E, So Cal Edison and SDG&E) reaches more than 5% of its customers’ peak power needs.

And while you can see the Monthly Net Metering 1.0 Program 5% limit is about to be reached…

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…the good news is that if your home or business has it’s solar energy system interconnected before the cap, you’ll be grandfathered into the NEM 1.0 incentive program from 20 years.

 

That’s 20 years!

 

To pass up a chance like this is similar to passing up the chance to purchase acres of land for pennies back in the day on the government’s 1862 Homestead Act.

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This is because the current government wants people to go green.

 

The Net Metering program rewards homes and businesses for using solar energy by giving them credits on their electricity bill.

 

The Net Metering 1.0 incentive allows people to earn credits at the same rate the utility companies charge for electricity.

 

So if your utility company charges about $0.15 per a KW and your home generates 1,500 KW, you’d get $225 paid to you by the utility company to either offset your utility bill, help pay off your solar installation or buy that man cheetah outfit you’ve been dreaming of:

3The soon to be engaged NEM 2.0 incentive program is a 124 page document that imposes time-of-use rates for Net Metered customers, decreasing the amount of compensation energy companies will pay in accordance with the time customers generate excess energy.

 

While California is one of a few states that’s sided more in the favor of the solar industry, other states, like Arizona, whose Net Metering 1.0 incentives are also set to expire haven’t been so lucky.

 

Whatever the future of Net Metering may hold, it’s a sure bet incentives, while still remaining fair, may never be as good as they are now.

 

 

 

 

Author: Harold Tan

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